The 2000’s were a pretty good time to start becoming a superhero movie fan. Everything from the teasers to the movies itself were unique experiments that helped build the genre into what it is today.

Batman Begins

Batman & Robin almost derailed the sanctity of the Batman universe. The superhero’s appeal in the big screens was in utter shambles. That was until Christopher Nolan took it upon himself to release a more grounded version with Batman Begins. The movie was essentially an attempt to re-instill faith in the Batman brand. And the teaser worked wonders. It showed us Batman in a light we had never seen before. The teaser for Batman Begins showed us a caped crusader that looked more realistic and plausible than ever.

Hulk

The 2003 Hulk movie does not get as much love as the Jade giant’s recent foray into the bi screens. It was the first official big screen adaptation for the Hulk. The Director had promised the Hulk movie will stay true to the comic book sources. And it did. The fans were eager to see Eric Bana’s version of the character. The teaser was more focused on shelling out the alter ego of Bruce Banner than the Hulk. It was mostly character driven and showed us a new side to the Hulk stories. The voice over narration helped too. the fans started subtly resonating with the beast hiding within. The marketing methods utilized for the movie were also equally intriguing and unique.

Spider-Man

If you are making a movie in the early 2000s era, chances are the teaser will be high octane action packed. But Sam Raimi took a rather different route. Instead of following the trending formula, he shot an entire scene for the movie just for the teaser. Contrary to how movies work, this particular teaser does not appear anywhere in the Spider-Man movie. A group of thieves successfully rob a bank and are getting away in a chopper. The chopper’s blades become entangled in a spider-web when the helicopter tries to cross in-between the Twin Towers. The teaser was released prior to the 9/11 attacks and was pulled out for obvious reasons. a new one was released later on.

X2: X-Men United

The trailer for X2: X-Men United was pretty odd and strange. The teaser was full of action sequences super imposed on loud techno-music. This made the movie feel like it will bomb. Thankfully the movie itself went in a rather serious tone when it released. The teaser began with a game of chess between Charles Xavier and Magneto. The duo are also discussing human-mutant relations and how a species war is about to begin. There are scenes of William Stryker in the background. When the X-mansion is under attack and Professor X is trapped in Magneto’s plastic prison cell, the latter claims “The War Has Begun”.

Superman Returns

The teaser trailer begins with the iconic voice of Marlon Brando in a dark void. We instantly realize the movie will be an ode to the classic Superman movies of the past. An adolescent Superman crashes to the ground. Under a warm blanket of sunlight, we see the Kent Farm in the background and John Williams’ ominous music fills the void. The teaser could have left it at that. But Singer wanted to do more. John William’s thematic music builds towards an obvious crest. Bryan Singer wantonly put elements from his original inspiration – the Richard Donner movies, into the teaser.

Spider-Man 3

Spider-Man 3 was the culmination of the Sam Raimi trilogy. Although premature, Sam Raimi wanted to leave no stones unturned for its marketing. Spider-Man 3’s success could be attributed less to the movie and more to the build-up and the legacy left behind by its predecessors. The teaser begins with a text crawl with a tinge of darkness being foreshadowed in the distance. The final scene gives us the actual villain of the movie – It’s Spider-Man in his black suit. eagle eyed fans knew what was soon to comer.

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