Genuinely Good Movies Killed By Bad Marketing

Nobody ever said that making a movie was easy. There are so many different things you have to take into consideration, and it can get quite overwhelming at times. Because of this, it’s important to know the market. Understanding the target audience allows filmmakers to create a campaign that speaks directly to them with more impact, which can not only build brand recognition but also attract fans. One needs imaginative ways of profiting from a film once it’s released. A good marketing practice for movies always starts out by taking note of the most recent developments in the industry. In this regard, these are the top three movies that were genuinely good but got killed by bad marketing –

Man Of Steel

Man of Steel ruined by Bad Marketing
Man of Steel

Related: Man of Steel: Why It’s Better Than You Remember

To drum up some buzz for the Man of Steel, Warner Bros entered into a deal with Gillette razors. There, they had to answer the question “How does Superman shave?” Unfortunately, this campaign ended up being widely mocked online. It happened because Superman’s shaving habits seemed relatively tame compared to what he could be doing if he wanted to. For example, if he didn’t need to shave, he could instead fly around the world and spit on Osama Bin Ladin’s corpse, or lift a car off of someone who was pinned under it like Baby Jessica.

I Love You, Beth Cooper

I Love You, Beth Cooper
I Love You, Beth Cooper

When trying to draw interest in the film among the target teen audience, the studio’s marketing team made a fatal error of trying to manufacture a viral video. The whole point of viral videos was that they happen organically and can’t really be planned. The video was somewhat controversial, with reports estimating that 18-year-old Los Angeles high school student Kenya Mejia was paid $1,500 for shamelessly pimping “Project X” during her own valedictorian speech.

Mission: Impossible III

Mission: Impossible III
Mission: Impossible III

This movie had a lot of action happening both onscreen and off-screen. Coupled with the success of this new release, Paramount Pictures wanted to set up a promotion that utilized the core idea behind what made their previous missions successful. To achieve this, they came up with the idea of musical newspaper boxes. When someone purchased their local paper, they would hear a side effect that they may not have expected—the film’s theme music playing through some hidden speakers. Unfortunately, it seems that this idea is not looking so good. Several customers have reported seeing the six-inch-long, red plastic boxes and their dangling wires tucked away inside the machines.

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